BBC forced to re-edit TV programme which exaggerated potential impact of minimum pricing

By Peter Ruddick

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Television, Bbc

The BBC has been forced to remove a Panorama programme from iPlayer which suggested 50,000 deaths of over-65-year-olds could be prevented with minimum pricing when the correct figure is actually 4-5 times lower
The BBC has been forced to remove a Panorama programme from iPlayer which suggested 50,000 deaths of over-65-year-olds could be prevented with minimum pricing when the correct figure is actually 4-5 times lower
The BBC has been forced to remove a TV programme from its iPlayer service which broadcasted figures which significantly exaggerated the potential health impacts among older people of an alcohol minimum pricing policy.

In an episode of its Panorama programme, originally broadcast on 10 September, the BBC presented figures obtained as a result of new research conducted by the University of Sheffield which claimed 50,000 deaths of over-65-year-olds could be prevented if a minimum per unit price for alcohol was introduced. 

However a 'human error' at the Yorkshire-based University had led to the figure provided to the broadcaster being four to five times higher than the correct statistic. 

A statement on the BBC Panorama website said: "The University emphasised the human error was wholly on their part and has apologised unreservedly to the BBC. The programme has been temporarily removed from iPlayer and is being re-edited to reflect the correct figures."

The Department of Health is consulting in the autumn on a possible minimum price per unit of alcohol after the policy was announced in this year's Alcohol Strategy while the Scottish Government is also planning to implement minimum pricing at 50p per unit.

Related topics: Legislation, Pubs & Bars, Trends & Reports

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