Hospitality skills crisis deepening

By Chris Druce

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Employment

Training and retaining staff such as chefs remains a challenge
Training and retaining staff such as chefs remains a challenge
The hospitality skills crisis is deepening, with more than a quarter of businesses within the sector claiming they employ staff lacking the skills needed for their jobs

The hospitality skills crisis is deepening, with more than a quarter of businesses within the sector claiming they employ staff lacking the skills needed for their jobs.

People 1st’s annual State of the Nation report found 26 per cent of businesses within hospitality employ staff they view as not fully proficient in their jobs – equivalent to 180,000 people.

This compares with 19 per cent, or 140,000 people working within the sector, two years ago.

Worryingly it also comes despite the fact that hospitality spends £2,575 per employee on training a year, compared to the average across all industries of the economy of £1,725.

Customer service skills gap

Customer service skills remain the most common skills gap across the sector. 65 per cent of businesses who reported skills gaps in their workforce stated that their staff lacked the required customer service skills, an increase from 57 per cent in 2007.

Other skill shortage areas included management, leadership, IT and chef skills.

Despite an easing in finding and retaining staff in general due to the recession, employers said recruiting trained chefs remained a challenge.

Staff turnover remains high

Irrespective of the recession, Labour turnover across the sector stood at 31 per cent in 2009, the highest of all sectors of the economy.

The hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism sector is one of the UK’s largest employers. It employs almost two million people (1,887,700), which equates to 7 per cent of all UK jobs.

Related topics: Trends & Reports

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1 comment

This article is a prime…

Posted by NULL,

This article is a prime example of our industry. I have been teaching in FE now for 10 years teaching the chefs of the future....... with my hands tied behind my back!! 

This skills shortage is all down to goverment funding, when i was at catering college i was required to attend 30 hours per week during this I had at least 2 real working environments, 2 dem and do sessions, kitchen french lanuage class and at least three hours theory. Now full time learners main programme of study is now delivered in 15 hours!!!!!! within this 1 real working environment, 1 dem and do and 1 theory class. No matter how good the teacher is 15 hours a week is simply not enough to deliver the skills required to a 16-19 year old learner to equip them for  job in industry. Due to this I feel the majority of college leavers fail in their first job then leave the industry to work in telesales etc..........

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